Table of Contents - Make MS Word Your Worker

The most meticulous part of writing your review is the Table of Contents.  This is obviously the last thing that you do (after writing the abstract) and that is not the time you want to be bogged down with details.  


Tips about Headings and Subheadings 

  • The Headings are the main parts of your review: Abstract, Table of Contents, Introduction, Methodology, Analysis and Discussion, Conclusions and Recommendations, and References.
  • Subheadings are GOOD.  They provide a visual framework for your readers. 
  • Subheadings should probably only be used in the Analysis and Discussion and Conclusions and Recommendations sections.  
  • You don't need subheadings in the Introduction and Methodology.

Using MS Word to Create Your Table of Contents 

MS Word can actually create your Table of Contents for you. You just need to tell MS Word which lines are the headings, subheadings, sub-subheadings and sub-sub-subheadings.  You do this by assigning a Style to each heading.  If you are using the UNI IT Masters Template, you will find that Headings 1 - 4 have already been created for you using the APA 6th Edition format.

I am going to describe how to prepare your headings and then create your Table of Contents in the steps below.  There will also be videos at the end of this posting which will demonstrate how to create a Table of Contents. (BTW, I am using a Mac to create this Table of Contents because that is what I have available. I have included a video at the end which will explain how to do it with Windows.)


Preparing Your Review for Your Table of Contents

  1. Write your review and insert headings where necessary.  
  2. Using the template, the Main Headings (Heading 1) have already been formatted.  They are bold and centered.
  3. Highlight a subheading (Heading 2) and click on the Heading 2 box in the Styles Section of the Home Menu at the top of your document in Word.  This should make this subheading bold and left justified. Do this throughout your review.
  4. Highlight a sub-subheading (Heading 3) and click on the Heading 3 box in the Styles Section. This should bold this sub-subheading and indent it 5 spaces.
  5. You get the idea - continue this to your sub-sub-subheadings, but I don't think that you will have any of those.

Asking MS Word to Create Your Table of Contents

Now that you have identified the headings et al. that you want to be included in your Table of Contents, MS Word can create your Table of Contents
  1. Place your cursor where you want your Table of Contents to be located.
  2. From the Insert Menu, select Index and Tables.
  3. Select Table of Contents from the appearing window. 
  4. Select From Template (See, we even created the TOC template for you.)
  5. VOILA!!!!!   You have a Table of Contents!

Updating Your Table of Contents

As you make ongoing changes to your review, it will mess up the accuracy of your TOC.  You can update it at will.  (Will who?)
  1. Right-Click on your TOC.
  2. Select Update Field.
  3. Make either selection on your appearing window.
  4. VOILA!!!!!   You have an updated TOC!

Creating a Table of Contents using Windows (Word 2013)




Creating a Table of Contents Using Mac OSX (Word 2011)

Examples Relevant to Literature Reviews

It can be useful to have examples of writing if you are trying to create a specific style of document.

You will find a number of examples throughout the RWLDs, the Assignment pages and in the back of the Galvan book.

"10-page" Literature Reviews for Seminar:


"30+ page" Literature Review (written as an IT Masters Culmination Activity)
Here is an example of a well-written, student-written literature review.  The review is actually 39 pages (+ references) but it will provide a good example.

Facilitating Transfer for Adult Learners Through Cross-Cultural e-Learning by Andy Rose

What do you think?  Were these examples useful?

Z

Module 11: Refining Your Abstract

You are almost done!!!

You have written your Introduction, Methodology, Analysis and Discussion, Conclusions and Recommendations.   Now all that you need to do is complete the beginning and the end of your Literature Review.  You need to complete your Abstract and your References.

Abstract

You have been reading abstracts forever.  These are the short, 150-word descriptions that give you a brief description of the contents of the article.  Within this short passage, you expect to find the topic, purpose, methodology and conclusions. This provides a usable overview for researchers.

Your abstract should follow the same structure as your review:
  1. Describe the topic in one sentence;
  2. Explain the purpose, thesis or organizing construct and the scope of the article;
  3. List the sources used; and
  4. Review the conclusions.
The best way to evaluate the completeness of an abstract is by asking yourself if it tells enough about the article for a researcher to read and decide whether this article will be useful for her research.

Here is an example of a good abstract that follows the outline above:


Universal Design for Learning (UDL) can be used to create differentiated learning environments. This review examines the effects of Universal Design for Learning on student achievement in a secondary school setting. Seven peer-reviewed research studies and one doctoral dissertation published between 2002-2010 were selected for analysis. The reviewed research studies indicated that students tended to perform better when material was presented through a multitude of channels and students were given a choice of methods for demonstrating proficiency. Future research into using UDL in the K-12 curriculum was recommended. (88 words)

Did it accomplish what was intended?  Please note that it is only 88 words.